crookedindifference:

Gulf Oil Spill “Not Over”: Dolphins, Turtles Dying in Record Numbers

Report warns that 14 species are still struggling from the 2010 disaster.

Four years after the biggest oil spill in U.S. history, several species of wildlife in the Gulf of Mexico are still struggling to recover, according to a new report. In particular, bottlenose dolphins and sea turtles are dying in record numbers, and the evidence is stronger than ever that their demise is connected to the spill, according to Doug Inkley, senior scientist for the National Wildlife Federation, which issued the report.

—More than 900 bottlenose dolphins have been found dead or stranded in the oil spill area since April 2010. If you stretched the corpses lengthwise, that’s 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometers) of dead dolphins, Inkley said. Scientists know that is more than in previous years because they’ve been recording deaths and strandings in the Gulf for a decade.

—There are five species of sea turtle that live in the Gulf, and all of them are listed as threatened or endangered by the Endangered Species Act. About 500 dead sea turtles have been found in the spill region every year since 2011—”a dramatic increase over normal rates,” according to the NWF. What’s unknown is how many turtles died at sea and were never recovered by scientists.

—An oil chemical from the spill has been shown to cause irregular heartbeats in the embryos of bluefin and yellowfin tuna. That’s a critical stage of development for the fish, so there’s a lot of concern that the damage could cause heart attacks or deaths, Inkley said. 

—Loons, birds that winter on the Louisiana coast, are carrying increasing concentrations of toxic oil compounds in their blood.

—Sperm whales that swam near the BP well have higher levels of DNA-damaging metals in their bodies than in the past. The metals in their bodies, such as chromium and nickel, are the same ones that were present in the well.

Download the full report:
Four Years Into the Gulf Oil Disaster: Still Waiting for Restoration (pdf)

crookedindifference:

25 Years Since the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

On March 24, 1989, the oil tanker Exxon Valdez had just entered Alaska’s Prince William Sound, after departing the Valdez Marine Terminal full of crude oil. At 12:04 am, the ship struck a reef, tearing open the hull and releasing 11 million gallons of oil into the environment. Initial responses by Exxon and the Alyeska Pipeline Company were insufficient to contain much of the spill, and a storm blew in soon after, spreading the oil widely. Eventually, more than 1,000 miles of coastline were fouled, and hundreds of thousands of animals perished. Exxon ended up paying billions in cleanup costs and fines, and remains tied up in court cases to this day. The captain, Joseph Hazelwood, was acquitted of being intoxicated while at the helm, but convicted on a misdemeanor charge of negligent discharge of oil, fined $50,000, and sentenced to 1,000 hours of community service. Though the oil has mostly disappeared from view, many Alaskan beaches remain polluted to this day, crude oil buried just inches below the surface.

mohandasgandhi:

newsweek:

What BP Doesn’t Want You To Know About The 2012 Gulf Oil Spill

“It’s as safe as Dawn dishwashing liquid.” 
That’s what Jamie Griffin says the BP man told her about the smelly, rainbow-streaked gunk coating the floor of the “floating hotel” where Griffin was feeding hundreds of cleanup workers during the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Apparently, the workers were tracking the gunk inside on their boots. Griffin, as chief cook and maid, was trying to clean it. But even boiling water didn’t work.
“The BP representative said, ‘Jamie, just mop it like you’d mop any other dirty floor,’” Griffin recalls in her Louisiana drawl.
It was the opening weeks of what everyone, echoing President Barack Obama, was calling “the worst environmental disaster in American history.” At 9:45 p.m. local time on April 20, 2010, a fiery explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig had killed 11 workers and injured 17. One mile underwater, the Macondo well had blown apart, unleashing a gusher of oil into the gulf. At risk were fishing areas that supplied one third of the seafood consumed in the U.S., beaches from Texas to Florida that drew billions of dollars’ worth of tourism to local economies, and Obama’s chances of reelection. Republicans were blaming him for mishandling the disaster, his poll numbers were falling, even his 11-year-old daughter was demanding, “Daddy, did you plug the hole yet?”
Griffin did as she was told: “I tried Pine-Sol, bleach, I even tried Dawn on those floors.” As she scrubbed, the mix of cleanser and gunk occasionally splashed onto her arms and face.
Within days, the 32-year-old single mother was coughing up blood and suffering constant headaches. She lost her voice. “My throat felt like I’d swallowed razor blades,” she says.
Then things got much worse.
Like hundreds, possibly thousands, of workers on the cleanup, Griffin soon fell ill with a cluster of excruciating, bizarre, grotesque ailments. By July, unstoppable muscle spasms were twisting her hands into immovable claws. In August, she began losing her short-term memory. After cooking professionally for 10 years, she couldn’t remember the recipe for vegetable soup; one morning, she got in the car to go to work, only to discover she hadn’t put on pants. The right side, but only the right side, of her body “started acting crazy. It felt like the nerves were coming out of my skin. It was so painful. My right leg swelled—my ankle would get as wide as my calf—and my skin got incredibly itchy.”

[Photo: Benjamin Lowy/Getty]

Remember Corexit, the dispersant BP claimed would “clean up” the oil spill and is made up of chemicals that are known carcinogens and used to make napalm/bombs?  It’s over 50 times more toxic than the oil itself.

mohandasgandhi:

newsweek:

What BP Doesn’t Want You To Know About The 2012 Gulf Oil Spill

“It’s as safe as Dawn dishwashing liquid.” 

That’s what Jamie Griffin says the BP man told her about the smelly, rainbow-streaked gunk coating the floor of the “floating hotel” where Griffin was feeding hundreds of cleanup workers during the BP oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico. Apparently, the workers were tracking the gunk inside on their boots. Griffin, as chief cook and maid, was trying to clean it. But even boiling water didn’t work.

“The BP representative said, ‘Jamie, just mop it like you’d mop any other dirty floor,’” Griffin recalls in her Louisiana drawl.

It was the opening weeks of what everyone, echoing President Barack Obama, was calling “the worst environmental disaster in American history.” At 9:45 p.m. local time on April 20, 2010, a fiery explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig had killed 11 workers and injured 17. One mile underwater, the Macondo well had blown apart, unleashing a gusher of oil into the gulf. At risk were fishing areas that supplied one third of the seafood consumed in the U.S., beaches from Texas to Florida that drew billions of dollars’ worth of tourism to local economies, and Obama’s chances of reelection. Republicans were blaming him for mishandling the disaster, his poll numbers were falling, even his 11-year-old daughter was demanding, “Daddy, did you plug the hole yet?”

Griffin did as she was told: “I tried Pine-Sol, bleach, I even tried Dawn on those floors.” As she scrubbed, the mix of cleanser and gunk occasionally splashed onto her arms and face.

Within days, the 32-year-old single mother was coughing up blood and suffering constant headaches. She lost her voice. “My throat felt like I’d swallowed razor blades,” she says.

Then things got much worse.

Like hundreds, possibly thousands, of workers on the cleanup, Griffin soon fell ill with a cluster of excruciating, bizarre, grotesque ailments. By July, unstoppable muscle spasms were twisting her hands into immovable claws. In August, she began losing her short-term memory. After cooking professionally for 10 years, she couldn’t remember the recipe for vegetable soup; one morning, she got in the car to go to work, only to discover she hadn’t put on pants. The right side, but only the right side, of her body “started acting crazy. It felt like the nerves were coming out of my skin. It was so painful. My right leg swelled—my ankle would get as wide as my calf—and my skin got incredibly itchy.”

[Photo: Benjamin Lowy/Getty]

Remember Corexit, the dispersant BP claimed would “clean up” the oil spill and is made up of chemicals that are known carcinogens and used to make napalm/bombs?  It’s over 50 times more toxic than the oil itself.

discoverynews:

Alarming Images of Oil-Drenched Gulf

Over two years after the BP oil disaster, the environmental group Greenpeace has received more than 300 new images, taken in 2010, of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill showing oil-covered turtles and sperm whales swimming through oil. The images were taken by the National Oceanic and Oceanographic Administration.

Greenpeace had submitted a Freedom of Information Request for images and information related to the BP Gulf of Mexico disaster in 2010. The request finally came through and what was offered was this first batch of files.

The disturbing images, all taken in 2010, show oil-drenched turtles and sperm whales swimming through oil.

Here, a dead turtle is shown on Whiskey Beach.

more images here

thedailywhat:

Better Late Than Never of the Day: To mark the two-year anniversary of the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history, an arrest has been made linking BP to the horrific aftermath. Kurt Mix, a former BP engineer, has been charged with two counts of obstructing justice for deleting from his iPhone hundreds of text messages he exchanged with a co-worker and a contractor, according to a criminal complaint unsealed today.
From the Wall Street Journal:

The deleted messages, some of which were recovered forensically, included sensitive information about the failure of one of the efforts to stop the flow of oil, known as the “top kill.” This includes a May 26, 2010, message from the first day of the top-kill efforts that said, “Too much flowrate—over 15,000,” indicating the flow from the well was three times higher than the company had said was the official rate of flow.

In related news, BP posted a 2011 profit of $26 billion; former BP exec Tony Hayward, now chief executive of oil venture Genel Energy, received in a mergerthis year shares worth $17 million.
[consumerist]

thedailywhat:

Better Late Than Never of the Day: To mark the two-year anniversary of the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history, an arrest has been made linking BP to the horrific aftermath. Kurt Mix, a former BP engineer, has been charged with two counts of obstructing justice for deleting from his iPhone hundreds of text messages he exchanged with a co-worker and a contractor, according to a criminal complaint unsealed today.

From the Wall Street Journal:

The deleted messages, some of which were recovered forensically, included sensitive information about the failure of one of the efforts to stop the flow of oil, known as the “top kill.” This includes a May 26, 2010, message from the first day of the top-kill efforts that said, “Too much flowrate—over 15,000,” indicating the flow from the well was three times higher than the company had said was the official rate of flow.

In related news, BP posted a 2011 profit of $26 billion; former BP exec Tony Hayward, now chief executive of oil venture Genel Energy, received in a mergerthis year shares worth $17 million.

[consumerist]

(Source: thedailywhat, via jessesantana)

mothernaturenetwork:

BP engineer arrested for destroying Gulf leak evidenceAuthorities arrested Kurt Mix for destroying evidence related to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster that killed 11 people. Mix tried to destroy hundreds of text messages that related to the incident. The messages, which have been partially recovered, showed BP knew for weeks that the incident was three times larger than official company estimates and that its “Top Kill” effort to plug it was failing.

mothernaturenetwork:

BP engineer arrested for destroying Gulf leak evidence
Authorities arrested Kurt Mix for destroying evidence related to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster that killed 11 people. Mix tried to destroy hundreds of text messages that related to the incident. The messages, which have been partially recovered, showed BP knew for weeks that the incident was three times larger than official company estimates and that its “Top Kill” effort to plug it was failing.

The Big Fix Movie

On Earthday, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon offshore drilling rig sank creating the worst oil spill in history. According to the global media, the story ended when the well was capped – but that’s when the real story began. By exposing the root causes of the oil spill and what really happened after the news cameras left the Gulf states, filmmakers Josh and Rebecca Tickell uncover a vast network of corruption.

The New Orleans Times Picayune says THE BIG FIX is “a full-on, no-holds-barred bit of investigative journalism” into the dark secrets surrounding one of the largest manmade environmental catastrophes in American history.

THE BIG FIX is “a damning indictment” (Time Out New York) of a system of government and corporate collusion that puts the pursuit of profit over all other human and environmental needs. Through “smart, covert reporting that shames our news media” (The Village Voice) The Big Fix is “a mandatory-viewing critique of widespread government corruption” (LA Weekly).

(Source: thebigfixmovie.com, via crookedindifference)

motherjones:

Remember the BP oil spill? The Corexit that BP used to “disperse” the oil can make it tougher for microbes to digest the oil. And, added bonus, it can get sucked up by human skin.

motherjones:

Remember the BP oil spill? The Corexit that BP used to “disperse” the oil can make it tougher for microbes to digest the oil. And, added bonus, it can get sucked up by human skin.

"The oil is still here and things are still dying. BP likes to make all their pretty commercials about how everything’s fine. Well I’m still here too and it’s not. But I’m going to keep doing what I’m doing to show people what’s really going on here."

— Laurel Lockamy, photographer, and resident of Gulfport, Mississippi.  Click here to see some of her photos from the Gulf shores. (via nrdc)

(via nrdc)

crookedindifference:

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